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« "Listen to his heart" by Denny Emerson | Main | Learning styles and your riding »

09/14/2009

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Well just in case you got booted out by your horse. Make sure to consult a chiropractor asap.

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It's one thing to identify the muscles and their functions but I believe that the larger focus should be your riding balance. Your leg muscles, regardless of classification, are used more efficiently when you have good form.

Davion

That’s really shewrd! Good to see the logic set out so well.

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My legs keep slipping back a bit during jumping and I have been told I should try to strengthen them, so I can use them better and keep myself more balanced.

I do some physiotherapist's exercises cos I used to get back pain after riding (yeah, and I am early teens, great) and these are designed to strengthen my back and core, especially for riding

I already ride my bike about 1 and a half miles home up hill after school which seems to help my thighs

But I don't really know of any good things to do to especially build calf muscles. My cousin said walking on tip toes up hill can work, is this true?

Does anybody have some good, non complex exercises that I can do at home for calf muscles? In fact, any other exercises that can help for riding would be sweet, but especially calfs and thighs.
Thanks

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You may fall into one of two categories here; the talented *natural* rider who uses these muscles without being aware of it, or the sceptic who says: You can't be serious -riding is about balance and being relaxed. Please read on; this is about those muscles that enable you to sit as though you were a part of the horse !

somanabolic

Check out the book _Fitness, Performance, and the Female Equestrian_ by
Mary Midkiff. It details what muscles one uses, and gives plenty of
exercises you can do to supple and strengthen them(in keeping with your
earlier post). My physical therapist *loved* this book and recommended it
even to her non-horsey patients, because it was so scientifically sound.

/Roo in Massachusetts

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